skip navigation

Scholars Program

Introducing 
Indiana Elite Scholars Academy

Indiana Elite FC is committed to the development of a lifelong passion for soccer to enhance not only skills in our athletes, but leadership, sportsmanship, teamwork, and discipline – both on the field and in the classroom.  Studies have proven that the advantages of competing in college sports is both immediate and long term, giving athletes countless opportunities to learn, compete and succeed.  According to the NCAA, student-athletes graduate at rates higher than college students in general.   Whether or not a player wants to try to extend their soccer career into college, playing sports helps tremendously when applying to colleges.  College admissions officers don't just look at grades and test scores; they also look at a student's extracurricular activities.   Playing a sport, staying active in the community and having an interest in music, art, or another hobby are not only helpful – they show that the student is well-rounded.

IEFC has a strong commitment to athletics and academics, and our student-athlete success rate.  This fall, Indiana Elite FC will implement several programs to assist our players in rising to athletic and academic challenges, including a free homework and tutoring program for our players needing extra assistance with academics, and ACT/SAT preparation classesOur club is proud to be the first in the area to offer academic assistance, tutoring, and test preparation to our players and families to help make the academic process less overwhelming, especially if this is the first time you are thinking about college. Many universities and colleges set a minimum GPA of 3.0 as a baseline for freshman admission and transfer students. But the fact is this: the minimum you need to graduate may not be the same as what you need to get into college.  Whether you choose a trade school, community college, four-year university, or Ivy League institution, the choice is YOURS. The time to start thinking about the future is now, and we are here to help.

Here are some helpful ways to track your student-athlete’s journey:

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Athletic goals

  • Keep track of your child’s accomplishments, championships won, and teams played.  You can make sure your player’s stats are accurately recorded at GotSoccer.com.  This site is widely used by schools and organizations, high school coaches, and college recruiters. 
  • Take pictures and video of your child during games or practices.  Not all colleges can afford to send recruiters, and video footage may make a difference in scholarship disbursement and team placement.  Remember, “A picture is worth a thousand words.”
  • Reinforce hard work, discipline, and sportsmanship with your child.  Lead by your actions on and off the field, and be an integral part of your child’s soccer team and club.  Help your child stay active during the off-season.

Academic goals

  • Start by talking about the value of education and college while your child is in elementary school. 
  • Plan academics, and discuss courses particularly in math and science with your child.  These classes are required in order to take more advanced math classes and science offerings such as physics and chemistry. English should be taken every year.  History, geography and science should be taken as much as possible, and most colleges require at least two years of a foreign language which can be started now.
  • Be an advocate for your child.  Actively seek scholarships to those institutions which you think may be a good fit based on your child’s interests.  It’s never too early to see what’s out there!
  • Encourage your student to do his/her best in school and on standardized tests.  Take tough classes and develop strong study habits now, so that good grades follow in high school.  Colleges are looking at classes and grades. 
  • Choose classes, electives, and volunteer opportunities that will help you explore your child’s interests.  Keep track of these for resumes and applications.
  • Guide your child in talking with other adults, relatives, teachers, and community members who he/she thinks has an interesting job, and ask what they like about their job, what education they received, and if they have any advice that would benefit your child.

HIGH SCHOOL

Athletic goals

  • Keep track of your accomplishments, championships won, and teams played.  You can make sure your player stats are accurately recorded at GotSoccer.com.  This site is widely used by schools and organizations, high school coaches and college recruiters. 
  • Ask someone to take pictures and video of you during games or practices.  Not all colleges can afford to send recruiters, and video footage may make a difference in scholarship disbursement and team placement.  Remember, “A picture is worth a thousand words.”
  • Remember that hard work, discipline, skill and sportsmanship are important.  Lead by your actions on and off the field to be an important part of your soccer club.  Stay active during the off-season.
  • Participate in soccer camps at the college or university you are thinking of attending.
  • Consider optional tournaments for additional exposure to coaches and recruiting scouts.
  • Be proactive with your future! If you wait until your applications are due to begin the college preparation process, you may have missed many opportunities for scholarships.  Some institutions begin awarding scholarships during your freshman year in high school. 
  • Visit www.NCAA.org regularly to keep up with the latest information available.

Academic goals

Freshman year

  • Map out an academic plan to get from freshman year to senior year, and eventually to the college(s) of your interest.
  • Plan a rigorous academic path.  Some AP and honors classes taken in high school may fulfill certain degree requirements.
  • Establish a relationship with your high school counselor and set up goals for the path you choose.
  • Take an English course every year to prepare for college.
  • Most colleges require three years of high school math.  More competitive colleges may require four. Take math classes such as geometry and algebra early to improve your standardized test scores.
  • Colleges look for at least three years of a laboratory science class such as biology, chemistry or physics, and Earth/space science. More competitive colleges may require four years of lab science.
  • Many colleges require at least two years of study in the same foreign language.  Some colleges require, others recommend, two semesters in the arts (art, dance, music, or drama).

Sophomore year

  • Research your careers and colleges, and start visiting right away.  This helps narrow down your lists of likes and dislikes so you can finalize your choice by senior year.
  • Start thinking about and exploring your colleges and careers.  Career and college fairs are a good place to start, but it’s never too early to set foot on campus.
  • Meet with your high school counselor to be sure your goals and academics are on track.
  • Start building a scholarship resume.  Extracurricular activities are a key element of the college application process.  The more extracurricular, volunteer, and leadership opportunities, the better!  

Many volunteer opportunities are available through the IEFC.  We are committed to helping our players track their hours each year, as well as provide a written letter for their resume materials.

Junior year

  • Seek out internships, summer jobs, and job shadows that align with your career of interest.
  • Focus on standardized testing, the ACT and SAT, and college entrance exams, and work hard to do well.  These tests are offered throughout high school, and to be considered for admission, most universities require at least one of these testsIndiana Elite FC will offer free ACT and SAT preparation classes and study materials through the club.  These classes will be tailored around practice schedules so we can offer our players every opportunity to excel on and off the field.
  • If you plan to attend a selective college, SAT Subject tests may be required. 
  • Meet with your high school counselor to be sure your goals and vision are on track.  Remember to talk to your coaches about where students of your skill may be recruited.

Senior year

  • Narrow down your list of colleges, finish up visits, and apply.  Be aware of application filing deadlines.
  • If you plan to apply for financial aid, check your college’s website to make sure the proper forms are completed. 
  • Meet with your high school counselor to be sure your goals and vision remain on track.  Remember to talk to your IEFC and high school coaches about where students of your skill may be recruited.
  • Remember that your senior year grades will be sent to all colleges to which you apply, so keep working hard!

 

Indiana Elite FC is working to expand its involvement in preparing our players for success on and off the soccer field. According to the NCAA, more than $2.7 billion in athletic scholarships is distributed each year along with access to medical care, academic support services, and first-class training opportunities. We want to encourage our high school athletes and their parents to be proactive in discussing future goals, and ask parents of middle school students to start navigating your child’s future path now.  With the academic programs IEFC is putting into place, we look forward to being an integral part of your child’s academic and athletic journey. Together, we will experience the positive impact and success of our IEFC student-athletes as we shape them for the future.

 

Sincerely,

 

Novi Marojevic


President, Indiana Elite FC
10971 Four Seasons Place, Suite 207, Crown Point IN 46307

If you have questions or would like to join the program, please contact:

Yatza 708-408-2630

jmarojevic@indianaelitefc.com

Carol 269-932-5169

carol@indianaelitefc.com